European School of Molecular Medicine

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2013 Call, List of Available Laboratories for this call*

The available positions are 10 subdivided as follows:

IEO

IFOM

Istituto Clinico Humanitas

*Please note that the available positions may be subject to changes during the application period
 
 

IEO

     
  • M. Mapelli . [ web page ]
    1 position [Only Marie Curie mobility fellowship is available for this position]

    Structural and functional characterization of the molecular mechanisms of mitotic spindle coupling to cortical polarity.
    The correct placement of the mitotic spindle during mitosis is fundamental in determining the relative position of the daughter cells, and hence in preserving tissue architecture. Furthermore, in several stem cell systems the orientation of the mitotic spindle ensures that only one of the two siblings retains niche contacts and stem-like properties. Recent data support the view that in mitosis the conserved NuMA/LGN/Gαi pathway is responsible for anchoring astral microtubules to the correct cortical sites and orient the spindle, with a coordination to cellular polarity that depends on the specific cellular type.
    In the past years, we have characterized the biochemical properties and the organizational principles of the NuMA/LGN/Gαi network from purified components, and have derived accurate models of how they work (Culurgioni et al. 2011 PNAS, Mapelli et al. 2012 Open Biol.). In particular we have addressed the issues of 1) how these force generating machines are clustered at restricted cortical sites; 2) how they are coordinated with the polarity proteins Par3/Par6/aPKC. However, regulatory circuits and ancillary subunits orchestrating the function of NuMA/LGN/Gαi in living cells still remain to be identified. The general goal of this project is the structural characterization of known protein complexes involved in spindle placement, and the identification new components of the network. The strategy to achieve this aim will combine X-ray crystallography, biochemistry, biophysics and cell biology.
    We are looking for a highly motivated and enthusiastic postdoctoral fellow who enjoys working as part of a collaborative and multidisciplinary team. The ideal candidate should have a PhD in protein structure, biochemistry or equivalent qualification, and extensive experience in protein expression and characterization. Previous experience in protein structure determination would be desirable.

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  • S. Minucci . [ web page ]
    1 position [Only Marie Curie mobility fellowship is available for this position]

    See Minucci's web page for a general introduction to his research projects.

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  • PG. Pelicci . [ web page ]
    2 positions [Only Marie Curie mobility fellowship are available for those positions]

    Two SIPOD sponsored postdoctoral positions are available in Pelicci's group:
    One project will focus on the generation of new mouse models of human cancers (xenotransplants) with a major interest in leukemia and breast tumors and on the set-up of innovative and ideal protocols for new therapeutic approaches. Previous experience on animal models would be desirable.
    The other project will be in the field of Computational biology. In details we are looking for a postdoctoral researcher to join the newly formed TiV (Target Identification and Validation) research group at IEO. The main aim of the group is to identify genes essential for cancer initiation and progression through high throughput in vivo RNAi screening. The ultimate goal is to identify "druggable" genes and design new therapeutic strategies to target them. Research in the group involves the use of a number of experimental systems including xenografts of human patient samples in immunocompromised animals as well as genetically modified mouse models. We are currently using high-throughput next generation sequencing for RNAi analysis, and whole-exome sequencing for the identification of mutation profiles in patients and corresponding xenografts. The Postdoctoral researcher will be a key member of the team, working to analyse and interpret the massive amounts of sequencing data.
    The job requires a range of skills such as software and algorithm development, as well as strong statistical background and good understanding of biological problems.
    Successful candidate will have:
    i)PhD degree in Computer science, Engineering, Biological Science or Biotechnology with strong experience in computational biology; ii)Strong analytical ability; iii)Experience in scripting languages such as python or perl in a Unix/Linux environment; iv)Knowledge of machine learning and/or biostatistics and familiarity with statistics packages such as R or Matlab; v)Demonstrated proficiency working with large "omic" datasets, such as NGS or microarray; vi)Knowledge of cancer biology is advantageous.
    Strong motivation, versatility, as well as excellent oral/written communication and good interpersonal skills are essential.

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  • G. Testa . [ web page ]
    2 positions [Both Marie Curie and National fellowships are available for those positions]

    Position 1
    Novel tools for direct epigenome interrogation during neural development
    The laboratory of Stem Cell Epigenetics headed by Giuseppe Testa invites applications for a SIPOD postdoctoral fellow with a solid background in chromatin/neurobiology and an interest in the epigenomic basis of neural development, with a specific focus on the acquisition and maintenance of cortical neuronal fate.
    The regulation of food intake is a major field of inquiry in biomedicine due to its critical impact on health, as most evident in the pandemic rise of obesity that constitutes a main risk factor for cancer development. Strong evidence indicates that epigenetic phenomena regulate both nutrient metabolism and feeding behavior, including neural diseases such as compulsive overeating and food addiction. This project is part of the research network 'FOODforTHOUGHT: The epigenomics of eating disorders', which was awarded within the ERA-NET NEURON Program on "Novel methods and approaches towards the understanding of brain diseases". Within the strong focus of our lab on the epigenetic mechanisms underlying neural development, this postdoctoral project pioneers the development of genetically-encoded tools that allow the direct interrogation of epigenomes from defined populations of neural stem cells and neurons during mouse corticogenesis. The successful candidate will validate the functional read-out of this approach by harnessing a unique panel of already available murine strains that allow to modulate selected chromatin modifiers and define their impact on corticogenesis through the elucidation of their transcriptomic and epigenomic programs.
    Requirements: PhD in Molecular Biology, Genetics or Biochemistry. Previous experience in chromatin biology, mouse genetics, neurobiology or stem cell biology is required. We are looking for a highly motivated scientist who wishes to join an interactive team at the cutting edge of epigenetics research (Fragola et al. Cell reprogramming requires silencing of a core subset of Polycomb targets PLoS Genetics, 2013 in press; Burgold et al. The H3K27 demethylase JMJD3 is required for maintenance of the embryonic respiratory neuronal network, neonatal breathing and survival Cell Reports, 2012; Testa et al. The time of timing: How Polycomb proteins regulate neurogenesis Bioessays, 2011; Campaner et al., Set7/9(Setd7) is dispensable for the p53-mediated DNA damage response Molecular Cell, 2011).

    Position 2
    Computational analysis of cell reprogramming-based disease models
    The laboratory of Stem Cell Epigenetics headed by Giuseppe Testa invites applications for a SIPOD postdoctoral fellow with a solid background in bioinformatics/systems/computational biology and an interest in the path breaking use of somatic cell reprogramming for disease modeling. The landmark derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from somatic cells is enabling a paradigm shift in our ability to model human diseases through the study of patient-specific disease-relevant cell-types and the reconstruction of disease-specific developmental milestones. Our lab has a strong focus on iPSC-based disease modeling that we apply to the study of cancer and neurodevelopmental disorders in order to dissect the genomic versus epigenomic contribution to their pathogenesis. The lab has already established a unique set of iPSC-based models for both intractable cancers and neurodevelopmental disorders associated to copy number variations (CNV). The successful candidate will harness this resource and combine the analysis of deep-sequencing data (genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic) with advanced reverse engineering tools to define the gene networks that underlie key transitions in disease pathogenesis and can thus serve a new therapeutic targets.
    Requirements: PhD in Computational Biology, Engineering, Mathematics, Genetics or Biochemistry, with a solid expertise in computer programming, bioinformatic analysis or systems biology. Specific expertise in the analysis of deep-sequencing data (exome-seq, RNAseq and ChIPseq) is encouraged but not required. We are looking for a highly motivated scientist who wishes to join a highly interactive team at the cutting edge of cancer and cell reprogramming research (Fragola et al. Cell reprogramming requires silencing of a core subset of Polycomb targets PLoS Genetics, 2013 in press; Burgold et al. The H3K27 demethylase JMJD3 is required for maintenance of the embryonic respiratory neuronal network, neonatal breathing and survival Cell Reports, 2012; Testa et al. The time of timing: How Polycomb proteins regulate neurogenesis Bioessays, 2011; Campaner et al., Set7/9(Setd7) is dispensable for the p53-mediated DNA damage response Molecular Cell, 2011).

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  • R. Visintin . [ web page ]
    1 position [Only Marie Curie mobility fellowship is available for this position]

    How do cells correctly inherit their chromosomes?
    This is a fundamental question in biology as all solid tumors contain abnormal numbers of chromosomes. Our lab uses the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that drive and control chromosome segregation during cell division, the process by which a cell generates two genetically identical daughter cells. In particular, we focus on mitosis, the phase of the cell cycle during which replicated genomes are separated and packaged into daughter nuclei. Three major transitions take place during mitosis: 1) the G2/M transition, where entry into mitosis is controlled; 2) the metaphase-anaphase transition, at which sister chromatid separation is triggered; and 3) the M/G1 transition, at which cells reverse the processes that led to mitotic entry and reset the conditions for a new round of cell division.
    In particular, the SEMM postdoc will work on a project aimed at obtaining a molecular understanding of the regulatory networks that control sister chromatid separation and spindle dynamics. We recently found a budding yeast mutant that cannot proceed through anaphase regardless of having degraded securin and cleaved cohesin. Elucidating the molecular defects characterizing our double mutant will allow us to define a novel pathway that is essential for sister chromatid segregation. To cover this position we are seeking to recruit an outstanding, highly motivated scientist to study the regulation of chromosome segregation in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae.
    The ability to work independently and strong skills in molecular and cell biology are required. Experience with the yeast cell cycle, live-cell microscopy and/or yeast genetics is an added advantage.

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IFOM

 
     
  • F. Blasi . [ web page ]
    1 position [Only Marie Curie mobility fellowship is available for this position]

    See Blasi's web page for a general introduction to his research projects.

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  • F. d'Adda di Fagagna . [ web page ]
    1 position [Only Marie Curie mobility fellowship is available for this position]

    Our group has an opening for one creative and motivated researcher at the postdoctoral level to advance our understanding of a recently discovered novel class of non coding RNAs modulating the local DNA damage response in mammalian cells (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22722852).The successful applicant will hold a PhD and will be able to demonstrate a deep understanding of mechanisms of DNA damage response regulation and DNA repair and the potential involvement of non-coding RNAs on genome stability.

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Istituto Clinico Humanitas

 
     
  • C. Garlanda . [ web page ]
    1 position [Only Marie Curie mobility fellowship is available for this position]

    Innate immunity in cancer-related inflammation
    Inflammatory cells and mediators are an essential component of the tumor microenvironment and a connection between inflammation and cancer is now established. Immune cells are key participants of the tumor microenvironment where they can promote or inhibit cancer formation and development. For instance, tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) are a well-known component of the inflammatory infiltrate of several tumors and key producers of many mediators (e.g. chemokines), which take part in the activation and maintenance of the chronic inflammatory process.
    A postdoctoral position for a project on inflammation and cancer is available at the Istituto Clinico Humanitas (ICH) in the research laboratory in immunology & inflammation directed by Prof Alberto Mantovani, under the supervision of Dr. Cecilia Garlanda. Our laboratory has a long-standing interest and track record (publications in high quality journals such as Science, PNAS, Cancer Res, Cancer Cell, J Exp Med...) in elucidating mechanisms involved in cancer-related inflammation.
    The aim of this project is to elucidate and characterize new cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in cancer-related inflammation. In particular, we will study the role played by the cells of the myeloid lineage in cancerogenesis and tumor progression.
    Applicant should have a high background in the fields of immunology, inflammation and cancer and technical expertise in animal handling. Applicant will be involved in experiments of immunophenotyping and functional characterization of tumor infiltrating leukocytes in mouse models and human tissues. Istituto Clinico Humanitas is a research center located in Rozzano (Milan, Italy) fully equipped to perform basic and clinical research in cellular and molecular biology, genetics and imaging.

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